Nursing Research

The National Institute of Nursing Research supports and conducts clinical and basic research and research training on health and illness across the lifespan.

The research focus encompasses health promotion and disease prevention, quality of life, health disparities, and end-of-life.

NINR

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seeks of extend nursing science by integrating the biological and behavioral sciences, employing new technologies to research questions, improving research methods, and developing the scientists of the future.

NINR accomplishes its mission through research on preventing, delaying the onset, and slowing the progression of disease and disability.

This includes (a) finding effective approaches to achieving and sustaining a healthy lifestyle and preventing diseases and disability; (b) improving the quality of life for patients, families, and informal caregivers by enhancing the individual's role in managing disease and disability, relieving symptoms, and improving outcomes; (c) eliminating health disparities, including disparities based on race/ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, geography, cultural factors, and disability, and (d) addressing issues at the end of life, improving palliative care, enhancing the quality of life for the dying patient, and supporting family and informal caregivers.

These efforts are crucial in translating scientific advances into cost- effective health care that does not compromise quality.

NINR accomplishes its mission by supporting grants to universities and other research organizations as well as by conducting research intramural at laboratories in Bethesda, Maryland.

The research fosters interdisciplinary collaborations to ensure a comprehensive approach to research on illness and disabling conditions.

This approach is especially relevant in research aimed at developing interventions that address the needs of diverse populations across the life span, adapting and generating new technologies, integrating biological and behavioral science, improving methods for future scientific discoveries.

In addition, the Institute supports comprehensive research training programs to prepare individuals with requisite interdisciplinary skills to conduct nursing research.

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program: NINR seeks to expand and improve the SBIR program; to increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal research and development; to increase small business participation in Federal research and development; and to foster and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged mall business concerns and women-owned small business concerns in technological innovation Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program: Through this program, NINR seeks to stimulate and foster scientific and technological innovation through cooperative research and development carried out between small business concerns and research institutions; to foster technology transfer between small business concerns and research institutions; to increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal research and development; and to foster and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged small business concerns and women-owned small business concerns in technological innovation.

Centers Program: To promote interdisciplinary research, offer an environment for research training and career development, and concentrate research through Centers for Nursing Research.
Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

(1) Reducing Environmental Risk to Rural Low Income Families; (2) Genetics, Environment and Weight Gain Post-transplant; (3) Preterm Birth: Psychoneuroimmunology in Hispanics; (4) Pain Rehabilitation: Patient Centered Outcomes; (5) Mother-Administered Interventions for VLBW Infants; (6) Mitochrondrial Genetics of Recovery After Brain Injury; (7) Estrogen and Testosterone in Experimental Stroke; (8) Family-to-Family: Psychoeducation to Improve Children's Outcomes in HIV+ Families; (9) Improving patient outcomes in end-of-life care provided by physicians and nurses.


Agency - Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services is the Federal government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially to those who are least able to help themselves.


Relevant Nonprofit Program Categories




Program Accomplishments

For fiscal year 2007, 329 research grants were awarded. For FY 2007, 92 NRSA Individual FTTPs were awarded and 154 NRSA Institutional FTTPs were awarded.

Uses and Use Restrictions

Research Grants: Funds may be used for salaries, consultation, equipment, travel and other usual costs, subject to Federal regulations applicable to the grant.

National Research Service Awards (NRSAs) (Individual): Individual awards are made to institutions on behalf of the individual for research training in specified areas related to the mission of NINR.

NRSAs (Institutional): Grants may be made to institutions to enable them to accept individuals for research training.

Each individual who receives a NRSA postdoctoral fellowship on an NRSA award must comply with all applicable service and payback provisions.

SBIR Phase I grants: (of approximately 6-months' duration) are to establish the technical merit and feasibility of a proposed research effort that may lead to a commercial product or process.

Only Phase I awardees are eligible to apply for Phase II support.

STTR Phase I grants (normally of 1-year duration) are to determine the scientific, technical, and commercial merit and feasibility of the proposed cooperative effort that has potential for commercial application.

Phase II funding is based on results of research initiated in Phase I and scientific and technical merit and commercial potential of Phase II application.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Research Grants: Any corporation, public or private institution or agency, or other legal entity, either nonprofit or for-profit, may apply.

NRSAs (Individual): An applicant must be a registered professional nurse with either a baccalaureate and/or a master's degree in nursing or a related field and must be a citizen of the United States or lawfully admitted for permanent residence.

Those on temporary or student visas are not eligible.

NRSAs (Institutional): An eligible institution must be capable of providing predoctoral and/or postdoctoral research training opportunities for nurses.

SBIR grants: can be awarded only to domestic small businesses (entities that are independently owned and operated for profit; are not dominant in the field in which research is being proposed; and have no more than 500 employees).

Primary employment (more than one-half time) of the principal investigator must be with the small business at the time of award and during the conduct of the proposed project.

In both Phase I and Phase II, the research must be performed in the United States or its possessions.

To be eligible for funding, a grant application must be reviewed for scientific merit and program relevance by a scientific review group and a national advisory council.

STTR grants can be awarded only to domestic small business concerns (entities that are independently owned and operated for profit, are not dominant in the field in which research is proposed and have no more than 500 employees) which "partner" with a research institution in cooperative research and development.

At least 40 percent of the project is to be performed by the small business concern and at least 30 percent by the research institution.

In both Phase I and Phase II, the research must be performed in the U.S.

and its possessions.

To be eligible for funding, a grant application must be approved for scientific merit and program relevance by a scientific review group and a national advisory council.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Individuals and public or private institutions.

Credentials/Documentation

Each applicant for research projects must present a research plan and furnish evidence that scientific competence, facilities, equipment, and supplies are appropriate to carry out the plan. NRSAs (Individual): The applicant's academic record, research experience, citizenship, licensure as a registered nurse, and institutional sponsorship should be documented in the application. NRSAs (Institutional): The applicant organization must show the objectives, methodology and resources for the research training program, the qualifications and experience of directing staff, the criteria to be used in selecting individuals for awards, and detailed budget justification for the amount of grant funds requested. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular A-21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions and OMB Circular A-87 for State and local governments. For-profit organizations' costs are determined in accordance with 48 CFR Subpart 31.2 of the Federal Acquisition Regulations. For other grantees, costs will be determined by HHS Regulations 45 CFR, Part 74, Subpart Q. For SBIR and STTR grants, applicant organization (small business concern) must present in a research plan an idea that has potential for commercialization and furnish evidence that scientific competence, experimental methods, facilities, equipment, and funds requested are appropriate to carry out the plan. The SF 424 (Research and Research-Related) application forms and the SF 424 SBIR/STTR Application Guide are used to apply for both SBIR and STTR, Phase I and Phase II. Application is made electronically through Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov).

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

None.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

Research Grants: Applications must be prepared either electronically through Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov) using the SF 424 (Research and Research-Related) or on paper using the PHS 398 research grant application instructions and forms (rev. 4/2006). The PHS 398 is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html. The format is interactive. For assistance contact GrantsInfo, Telephone (301) 435- 0714, Email: GrantsInfo@nih.gov. NRSAs (Individual): Individuals must submit the application form, PHS Individual National Research Service Award (PHS 416-1, rev. 10/05), and include at least three letters of reference. If the applicant has been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence, the appropriate item should be checked on the Face Page of the application. Applicants who have applied for and have not yet been granted admission as a permanent resident should check the Permanent resident block on the Face Page of the PHS 416-1 application, and also write in the word "pending." A notarized statement documenting legal admission for permanent residence must be submitted prior to the issuance of an award. SBIR and STTR: The SF 424 (Research and Research-Related) application forms and the SF 424 SBIR/STTR Application Guide are used to apply for both SBIR and STTR grants, Phase I and Phase II. Application must be made electronically through grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov). For further assistance contact GrantsInfo, Telephone: (301) 435-0714, E-mail: GrantsInfo@nih.gov.

Award Procedures

Research Grants and NRSAs (Institutional): All accepted applications are reviewed for scientific merit by an appropriate initial review group and then by a national advisory council. (Individual NRSA applications are not reviewed by council.) All applications favorably recommended compete for available funds on the basis of scientific merit and mission/program relevance. All accepted SBIR/STTR applications are evaluated for scientific and technical merit by an appropriate scientific peer review panel and by a national advisory council. All applications receiving a priority score compete for available SBIR/STTR set-aside funds on the basis of scientific and technical merit and commercial potential of the proposed research, mission/program relevance, and program balance among the areas of research.

Deadlines

Research Grants: New R01 -- February 5, June 5, and October 5; Renewal R01 -- March 5, July 5, and November 5. New R03, R21 -- February 16, June 16, October 16; Resubmission R03, R21 -- March 16, July 16, November 16. New and Resubmission R15 --February 25, June 25, October 25: Individual NRSAs: April 8, August 8, and December 8. Institutional NRSA's: May 25 only. SBIR and STTR: April 5, August 5, and December 5. AIDS-Related grants: May 7, September 7, and January 7. For details on submission dates, see the following website: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/submissionschedule.htm.

Authorization

Public Health Service Act, Sections 301, 483, 484, and 487, as amended, Public Law 99-158; Small Business Research and Development Act of 1992, Public Law 102-564.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Research Grants: From 6 to 9 months. NRSAs: From 6 to 9 months. SBIR/STTR: About 7-1/2 months. AIDS Grants: About 6 months.

Appeals

Research Grants: A principal investigator may question the substantive or procedural aspects of the review of his/her application by communicating with the staff of the NINR.

Renewals

Research Grants: Renewal applications are accepted. NRSAs: Awards may be made for 1 to 5 years. No individual may receive more than 5 years of aggregate NRSA support beyond the predoctoral level, and no individual may receive NRSA support for more than 3 years of support beyond the postdoctoral level. Institutional awards may be renewed.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

None.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Research Grants: Awards are usually made annually with no project periods to exceed 5 years in length. NRSAs: Institutional awards may be made for up to 5 years, and Individual awards may be made for up to 5 years at the predoctoral level, 3 years at postdoctoral level, and 2 years at senior level. SBIR: Normally, Phase I awards are for 6 months; normally, Phase II awards are for 2 years. STTR: Normally, Phase I awards are for 1 year; normally, Phase II awards are for 2 years.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

Progress reports and financial status reports where applicable are required annually for continuing projects.

Final reports including the financial status report on all projects are required within 90 days after their conclusion.

Recipients of NRSAs are required to file termination reports to ascertain compliance with the service and payback provisions.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Nonprofit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular A-133. In addition, grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspection and audits by DHHS and other Federal officials.

Records

Records must be retained for 3 years or longer if not audited or audit findings have not been resolved.

Financial Information

Account Identification

75-0889-0-1-552.

Obigations

(Research Grants) FY 07 $110,914,000; FY 08 est $110,967,000; and FY 09 est $110,840,000. (National Research Service Awards (NRSA) FY 07 $10,088,000; FY 08 est $10,088,000; and FY 09 est $10,154,000.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

(Research Grants) $3,000 to $717,109; $337,000. (NRSAs) Individual Awards $3,778 to $55,152; $33,000. Institutional Awards $46,352 to $481,559; $314,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

Research Grants: Grants will be available under the authority of and administered in accordance with the NIH Grants Policy Statement and Federal regulations at 42 CFR 52 and 42 USC 241; Omnibus Solicitation of the Public Health Service for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grant and Cooperative Agreement Applications. Omnibus Solicitation of the National Institutes of Health for Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant Applications.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

Program areas are as follows: Chronic conditions and infectious diseases, including health issues of individuals with arthritis, diabetes, urinary incontinence, digestive disorders, and musculoskeletal disorders; Health behavior and minority health, including studies of health disparities, women's health, men's health, and health and risk behaviors research; Cardiopulmonary and critical care science, including research on responses to acute cardiovascular events, chronic management of cardiovascular disease, and responses to acute and chronic pulmonary conditions such as COPD, asthma, and other non-infection-caused conditions; Neuroscience, including research on symptom management and/or prevention of cognitive deficits, neurological conditions, and informal caregiving for persons with these conditions; HIV/AIDS and oncology, including symptom management, self-management, and caregiving of patients with cancer, HIV/AIDS, and immune disorders; Reproductive, child, and family health, including reproduction and child bearing issues, infant development and illness, child and adolescent health promotion and risk reduction, and family health; End of life and long term care, including clinical management of physical and psychological symptoms, communication, ethics and clinical decision-making, caregiver support, and care delivery issues at the end of life. Program Contact is Dr. Yvonne Bryan, Acting Chief, Office of Extramural Programs. Address: National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Room 710, One Democracy Plaza, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Bethesda, MD 20892. Telephone: (301) 594- 6906. Grants Management Contact is Mr. Brian Albertini, Grants Management Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Room 710, One Democracy Plaza, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Bethesda, MD 20892. Telephone: (301) 594-6869. Use the same numbers for FTS.

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

The major elements in evaluating proposals include assessments of: (1) Significance: Does this study address an important problem? If the aims of the application are achieved, how will scientific knowledge or clinical practice be advanced? What will be the effect of these studies on the concepts, methods, technologies, treatments, services, or preventative interventions that drive this field? (2) Approach: Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analyses adequately developed, well-integrated, well-reasoned, and appropriate to the aims of the project? Does the applicant acknowledge potential problem areas and consider alternative tactics? For applications designating multiple PIs, is the leadership approach, including the designated roles and responsibilities, governance, and organizational structure, consistent with and justified by the aims of the project and the expertise of each of the PIs? (3) Innovation: Is the project original and innovative? Does the project challenge existing paradigms or clinical practice; address an innovative hypothesis or critical barrier to progress in the field? Does the project develop or employ novel concepts, approaches or methodologies, tools, or technologies for this area? (4) Investigators: Are the PD/PIs and other key personnel appropriately trained and well suited to carry out this work? Is the work proposed appropriate to the experience level(s) of the principal investigator(s) and other researchers? Do the PD/PIs and investigative team bring complementary and integrated expertise to the project (if applicable)? (5) Environment: Do(es) the scientific environment(s) in which the work will be done contribute to the probability of success? Do the proposed studies benefit from unique features of the scientific environment(s), or subject populations, or employ useful collaborative arrangements? Is there evidence of institutional support? In addition to the above criteria, the following items will continue to be considered in the determination of scientific merit and the priority score: Resubmission Applications (formerly revised/amended applications): Are the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group adequate? Are the improvements in the resubmission application appropriate? Protection of Human Subjects from Research Risk: The involvement of human subjects and protections from research risk relating to their participation in the proposed research will be assessed. Inclusion of Women, Minorities and Children in Research: The adequacy of plans to include subjects from both genders, all racial and ethnic groups (and subgroups), and children as appropriate for the scientific goals of the research will be assessed. Plans for the recruitment and retention of subjects will also be evaluated. Care and Use of Vertebrate Animals in Research: If vertebrate animals are to be used in the project, the adequacy of the plans for care and use of vertebrate animals to be used in the project will be assessed. Biohazards: If materials or procedures are proposed that are potentially hazardous to research personnel and/or the environment, determine if the proposed protection is adequate. Applications compete for available funds with all other recommended applications. The following will be considered in making funding decisions: Scientific merit of the proposed project as determined by peer review; Availability of funds; Relevance of program priorities. The following criteria will be used in considering the scientific and technical merit of all SBIR/STTR grant applications: Significance: Does the proposed project have commercial potential to lead to a marketable product, process or service? Does this study address an important problem? What may be the anticipated commercial and societal benefits that may be derived from the proposed research? If the aims of the application are achieved, how will scientific knowledge orclinicalpracticebe advanced? What will be the effect of these studies on the concepts, methods, technologies, treatments, services, or preventative interventions that drive this field? Does the application lead to enabling technologies (e.g., instrumentation, software) for further discoveries? Will the technology have a competitive advantage over existing/alternate technologies that can meet the market needs? Approach: Are the conceptual or clinical framework, design, methods, and analyses adequately developed, well-integrated, well-reasoned, and appropriate to the aims of the project? Is the proposed plan a sound approach for establishing technical and commercial feasibility? Are the milestones and evaluation procedures appropriate? Does the applicant acknowledge potential problem areas and consider alternative tactics? For applications designating multiple PDs/PIs, is the leadership approach, including the designated roles and responsibilities, governance, and organizational structure, consistent with and justified by the aims of the project and the expertise of each of the PDs/PIs? Innovation: Is the project original and innovative? For example: Does the project challenge existing paradigms or clinical practice; address an innovative hypothesis or critical barrier to progress in the field? Does the project develop or employ novel concepts, approaches, methodologies, tools, or technologies for this area? Investigator(s): Are the PD/PI(s) and other key personnel appropriately trained and well suited to carry out this work? Is the work proposed appropriate to the experience level of the PD/PI(s) and other researchers, including consultants and subcontractors (if any)? Do the PD/PIs and investigative team bring complementary and integrated expertise to the project (if applicable)? Are the relationships of the key personnel to the small business and to other institutions appropriate for the work proposed? Environment: Do(es) the scientific and technological environment in which the work will be done contribute to the probability of success? Do the proposed studies benefit from unique features of the scientific environment, or subject populations, or employ useful collaborative arrangements? Is there evidence of institutional support? Is there sufficient access to resources (e.g., equipment, facilities)? In addition to the above criteria, Phase II grant applications will be reviewed based upon the following criteria: 1. How well did the applicant demonstrate progress toward meeting the Phase I objectives, demonstrating feasibility, and providing a solid foundation for the proposed Phase II activity? 2. Did the applicant submit a concise Commercialization Plan that adequately addresses the specific areas described in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide and the SBIR/STTR Information component? 3. Does the project carry a high degree of commercial potential, as described in the Commercialization Plan? In addition to the above criteria, the following items will continue to be considered in the determination of scientific merit and the priority score: Resubmission Applications: Are the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group adequate? Are the improvements in the resubmission application appropriate? Protection of Human Subjects from Research Risk: The involvement of human subjects and protections from research risk relating to their participation in the proposed research will be assessed. Inclusion of Women, Minorities and Children in Research: The adequacy of plans to include subjects from both genders, all racial and ethnic groups (and subgroups), and children as appropriate for the scientific goals of the research will be assessed. Plans for the recruitment and retention of subjects will also be evaluated. Care and Use of Vertebrate Animals in Research: If vertebrate animals are to be used in the project, the adequacy of the plans for their care and use will be assessed. Biohazards: Ifmaterials orproedures areproposed that are potentially hazardous to research personnel and/or the environment, determine if the proposed protection is adequate. SBIR/STTR applications compete for available funds with all other recommended SBIR/STTR applications. The following will be considered in making funding decisions: Scientific and technical merit of the proposed project as determined by peer review; Availability of funds; Relevance of the proposed project to program priorities.



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