Biomonitoring Programs for State Public Health Laboratories

The objectives of this federal assistance is to support the development or expansion of state-based biomonitoring programs, including necessary infrastructure, that will increase the capability and capacity of state public health laboratories (1) to assess human exposure to environmental chemicals within
their jurisdictions; (2) to determine which chemicals people are exposed to and the levels of those chemicals in people s bodies; (3) to determine the prevalence of people with levels of chemicals that are above a known toxicity threshold; (4) to determine whether levels of selected chemicals are higher among minorities, children, women of childbearing age, or other potentially vulnerable groups; (5) to assess the effectiveness of state public health actions to reduce the exposure of their residents to specific chemicals of concern; (6) to compare state-generated biomonitoring data with CDC national biomonitoring data; and (7) to track trends in levels of chemicals in a state s population or subgroups of that population over time.

Agency - Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services is the Federal government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially to those who are least able to help themselves.

Website Address

http://www.cdc.gov



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2008: Throughout the world, biomonitoring is the standard for assessing people s exposure to chemicals in the environment as well as for responding to public health problems that can result from exposure to environmental chemicals. Biomonitoring is the direct measurement of environmental chemicals in people s blood, urine, or other body tissues. Predicting levels of chemicals in people s bodies after exposure is often based on estimates or measurements of the chemicals in air, soil, water, food, or commercial products. Using such information to estimate body burden also involves making assumptions about the influences of such factors as people s personal habits and lifestyles; the toxicokinetics of the chemical (i.e., absorption, distribution in the body, metabolism, and elimination); and the contribution of genetic factors that can differ in individuals. In contrast, biomonitoring provides a definitive measure of which specific chemicals-and how much-get into people after they have been exposed. The value of biomonitoring lies in decreasing the uncertainty in assessing levels of human exposure, thus vastly improving the ability of public health officials to make timely and appropriate public health decisions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has used this important public health tool for at least three decades to determine people s exposure to chemicals and has provided critical national data about human exposure to hundreds of environmental chemicals. These findings have been published in the peer-reviewed literature and in CDC s highly influential National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals (see http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/). State public health officials have recognized the value of this report but also recognize that the data contained in the report are not state specific. Consequently, health departments are interested in conducting biomonitoring assessments of chemical exposures among residents within their jurisdictions. Providing funding to state public health laboratories to develop or expand biomonitoring programs will give states the help they need to assess exposure to chemicals of concern and to be able to assess the effectiveness of public health efforts to reduce exposure to these chemicals. Fiscal Year 2009: No Current Data Available Fiscal Year 2010: No Current Data Available

Uses and Use Restrictions

Cooperative agreements may be made to eligible entities for the support of projects to develop or expand state-based biomonitoring programs.

Funding may be used for personnel salaries (for full-time, part-time, or contractor positions), laboratory instruments and supplies, training, travel, and indirect costs.

Funds may not be used for research, clinical care, furniture or office equipment, pre-award costs, or the construction of new laboratory space.

In addition, the direct and primary recipient in the cooperative agreement program must perform a substantial role in carrying out project objectives and not merely serve as a conduit for an award to another party or provider who is ineligible.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

State (includes District of Columbia, public institutions of higher education and hospitals): Health/Medical

Beneficiary Eligibility

State

Credentials/Documentation

Applicants should review the individual CDC Guidance documents issued under this CFDA program for any required proof or certifications that must be submitted with the application package. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs." An applicant should consult the office of official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is eligible for coverage under E.O.

12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs." An applicant should consult the office or official designated as the single point of contact in his or her State for more information on the process the State requires to be followed in applying for assistance, if the State has selected the program for review.

Application Procedures

OMB Circular No. A-102 applies to this program. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-110. Applications and required forms for this program can be obtained from Grants.gov or from the Grants Management Officer, Grants Management Branch, Procurement and Grants Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Please visit the Grants.gov Web site at www.grants.gov to find and apply for all Federal grant/cooperative agreement opportunities.

Award Procedures

After review and approval of an application, a notice of award is made in writing and issued by the Grants Management Officer, Procurement and Grants Office, CDC. Appropriate notification is also made to the public.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

This program is authorized under Section 317 of the Public Health Service Act, (42 U.S.C. Section 247 b), as amended., 42 U.S.C 247b.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

From 60 to 90 days.

Appeals

Not Applicable.

Renewals

Support is recommended for a specified project period, not to exceed 5 years, with each project period having a 12-month budget period.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program.

Matching requirements are not applicable to this program.

MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Support is recommended for a specified project period, not to exceed 5 years. Awards are made annually and assistance is available for a twelve month budget period. There are five budget periods within the 5-year project period. After awards are issued, funds are released in accordance with DHHS payment procedures, which may be through an Electronic Transfer System or a Monthly Cash Request System. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: lump sum.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

Program reports are not applicable.

Cash reports are not applicable.

Annual progress reports are required.

Financial status reports are required no later than 90 days after the end of each budget period.

Final financial status and performance reports are required 90 days after the end of a project period.

Annual progress reports are required.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133 (Revised, June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A- 133 (Revised June 27, 2003), "Audits of States, Local Governments, and Nonprofit Organizations," nonfederal entities that expend financial assistance of $500,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $500,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. In addition, grants and cooperative agreements are subject to inspection and audits by DHHS and other Federal government officials.

Records

Grantees are required to maintain grant accounting records for a minimum of 3 years after the end of a grant period. If any litigation, claim, negotiation, audit or other action involving the record has been started before the expiration of the 3-year period, the records shall be retained until completion of the action and resolution of all issues which arise from it, or until the end of the regular 3-year period, whichever is later. More detailed information regarding retention requirements is provided in 45 CFR Parts 74 and 92.

Financial Information

Account Identification

75-0943-0-1-550.

Obigations

(Cooperative Agreements) FY 08 $0; FY 09 est $15,000,000; FY 10 est $15,000,000 - Range: $1 million to $ 3 million per award
Approximate average award: $2.14 million.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

No Data Available.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

This program is subject to the provisions of 45 CFR Part 92 for State, local and tribal governments and 45 CFR Part 74 for institutions of higher education, hospitals, other nonprofit organizations and commercial organizations. HHS Grants Policy Statement at: http://www.hhs.gov/grantsnet/adminis/gpd/index.htm.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

Caroline Gardner, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, MS F61, , Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717 Email: ctg8@cdc.gov Phone: (770) 488-0572.

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Proposal selection criteria can be found in the program guidance.



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